Nonfiction Monday December 10, 2012

A sincere thank you to everyone who chose to celebrate children’s nonfiction today by taking time to create a blog post, even though it is an incredibly busy time of year. Kudos!

(Links to the book titles take you to the full review.)

 

Lisa is up first this morning at Shelf-employed with The Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never-Ending Search for a Cure. She says that she reflects “on my own personal recollections of the disease – from the days of sticking American Lung Association ‘Christmas seals’ on our cards and letters to the day when my youngest child received his ‘bubble test.’ Tuberculosis – it’s been with us all since the beginning and we haven’t stopped it yet – a frightening and fascinating topic.”

 

Writing at Sally’s Bookshelf, Sue joins us today with Far from Shore: Chronicles of an Open Ocean Voyage. Artist/author/biologist Sophie Webb describes and paints her adventures aboard her research vessel during a true-life cruise through the Pacific.

 

 

At A Teaching Life, Tara is sharing a book about the immigrant experience in America with a different mirror : A History of Multicultural America for Young People by Ronald Takaki adapted by Rebecca Stefoff.

 

 

Jeanne reviews The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau at True Tales & A Cherry On Top.  Did you know that “Henri Rousseau began painting at age forty without formal training, and his art was ridiculed year after year(?) But he kept painting because that is what he loved to do. As he said to a journalist, ‘I don’t know if you’re like me … but when I go into the glass houses and I see the strange plants of exotic lands, it seems to me that I enter into a dream. I feel that I’m somebody else completely.’ Rousseau’s story captures the power of imagination!”

 

Amy says her 7-year-old daughter devoured the terrific beginning reader nonfiction picture book, Castle: How It Works by David Macaulay with Sheila Keenan, reviewed at Hope Is the Word.

Debbie of The Swimmer Writer takes a look at Timeless Thomas: How Thomas Edison Changed Our Lives
 by Gene Barretta. She reports this is not a traditional biography of Thomas Edison, but instead it discusses the impact his inventions had on our lives.

 

At Supratentorial, Alice and her family enjoyed Minette’s Feast, a fantastic new biography of Julia Child. (Minette is one lucky cat.)

 

Look for a review of Annie Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller by Joseph Lambert at JeanLittleLibrary, where Jennifer writes, “there have been a lot of biographies of Helen Keller, but this graphic biography focuses on Annie Sullivan and the art conveys a whole new dimension to the characters of the two girls.”

Margo at The Fourth Musketeer recommends Picasso: I the King, Yo el rey for children 12 years old and older. She points out this “new biography in verse of the iconic 20th century artist” may look like a picture book, but it is definitely for more mature readers.

 

Perogyo of Perogies & Gyoza shares Island Kids, which is a collection of adventurous stories about kids on the Pacific islands of British Columbia, “with such fascinating topics as rats, parrots, monkeys, cougars, and a chocolate strike!” Who wouldn’t want to know more?

 

Lynn Rutan and Cindy Dobrez of Bookends: Booklist Online Youth Blog ” are reviewing a wonderful book for elementary and middle school readers – The Skull in the Rock. This is a fabulous book that combines the biography of a scientist, an explanation of current methods and theories in human evolution and an exciting discovery.” Now, that sound like quite a find.

 

Congratulations to Anastasia on the release of her new book, Developing and Designing Your Glee Club Performance. She says, “it shows high school students how to start their own glee club (a.k.a. show choir).” Sounds like a fun project, see details at Booktalking.

Abby has found treasure in the form of Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors , a “gorgeous book sharing information about Islam through the lens of exploring different colors.” This all can be found at Abby the Librarian.

 

 

Janet Squires, of All About the Books with Janet Squires, suggests The Kids’ Guide to Paper Airplanes, because “the holiday season is filled with advertising for digital and electronic games and toys, but sometimes fun can be found in the simplest of items — paper!” How true!

 


Nancy found a book to explain Hanukkah to her children. She says Celebrate Hanukkah has “really great photos.” Take a look at The Busy Mom Bookshelf.

Alicia of The LibrariYAn shares Titanic: Voices From the Disaster by Deborah Hopkinson. She writes, “Not only is it thoroughly researched (with plenty of extras for those who want to learn more), but the narrative, which weaves together the stories of various crew and passengers, is rich with detail and written in such a compelling style that it’s hard to put down.”

 

Here at Wrapped In Foil, I reviewed the picture book biography Queen of the Track: Alice Coachman, Olympic High-Jump Champion by Heather Lang and illustrated by Floyd Cooper.

That finishes our round-up for today. Hope to see you all next week.

 

Nonfiction Monday is a blogging celebration of nonfiction books for kids. We invite you to join us. For more information and a schedule, stop by Booktalking to see who is hosting each week.


Comments

Nonfiction Monday December 10, 2012 — 12 Comments

  1. Hi Roberta,

    Thanks so much for hosting Nonfiction Monday. Hmmm…I’m probably missing something, but I couldn’t figure out how to submit the information on the form, so I’m sharing my submission here instead…

    Name: Jeanne

    Title: The Fantastic Jungles of Henri Rousseau

    Link: http://jeannewalkerharvey.blogspot.com/2012/12/the-fantastic-jungles-of-henri-rousseau.html

    Description: Henri Rousseau began painting at age forty without formal training, and his art was ridiculed year after year. But he kept painting because that is what he loved to do. As he said to a journalist, “I don’t know if you’re like me … but when I go into the glass houses and I see the strange plants of exotic lands, it seems to me that I enter into a dream. I feel that I’m somebody else completely.” Rousseau’s story captures the power of imagination!

  2. Jeanne, it might be your browser. I have had that problem with Mr. Linky, and when I changed browsers (to Safari) it was fine. I am brand new with Google Drive forms, so thanks for the feedback. I will see if anyone else had problems.

  3. Deborah, I appreciate you stopping back. Timeless Thomas does look like an innovative way to treat a biography, via the person’s impact on the present. Sounds like the author was “inventive” as well. 🙂

  4. One of my favorite nonfiction picture books is: Trout Are Made Of Trees by April Pulley Sayre. It shows the food chain starting at leaves falling from trees.

  5. A great roundup today! Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns looks gorgeous, and I’m so happy for Anastasia on the release of her new book. I’m going to hop on over to her site right now! Thanks for hosting.

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