Thomas Jefferson for Kids

Looking for activities to celebrate President’s Day? It might just be time to pull out Thomas Jefferson for Kids: His Life and Times with 21 Activities by Brandon Marie Miller, as well as some other titles in the For Kids series. thomas-Jefferson-for-kids

Like other books in the series, Thomas Jefferson is a solid biography. In chronological order starting with his birth and early childhood, Miller builds a clear picture of a man who is remarkably well-rounded. Did you know Jefferson learned how to make pasta while he was in Italy and had a hand in introducing what he called “macaroni” to the United States?

The activities allow readers to delve more deeply into certain aspects of Jefferson’s life, from learning games he played to designing a Palladian window like he used for his home, Monticello. Kinesthetic learners will definitely appreciate the opportunity to explore history in a way that accommodates their learning style.

One criticism I have heard of this book in particular (because of details of Jefferson’s love interests), but others in the series as well, is that even though they say they are for kids the text seems aimed more for adults. I would say that middle graders may not read it from cover to cover in one sitting, but will definitely find it a useful resource for a report or project. There are plenty of sidebars to catch the reader’s eye, in addition to the activity ideas. Plus, no matter what the title says, these books are definitely a gold mine for educators.

Edit: More about What Thomas Jefferson Ate

Other titles in the series that could be used for President’s Day:

George Washington for Kids: His Life and Times with 21 Activities by Brandon Marie Miller

george-washington

Abraham Lincoln for Kids: His Life and Times with 21 Activities by Janis Herbert

Abraham-lincoln

Reading level: Ages 9 and up
Paperback: 144 pages
Publisher: Chicago Review Press (September 1, 2011)
ISBN-10: 1569763488
ISBN-13: 978-1569763483

This book was previously provided for review by the publisher.

 

Nonfiction Monday is a blogging celebration of nonfiction books for kids. We invite you to join us. For more information and a schedule, stop by Booktalking to see who is hosting each week.


Comments

Thomas Jefferson for Kids — 2 Comments

  1. I’m more familiar with the scientists part of the series. I’ve always promoted them more as a teaching resource than a kid resource but thought it a stong series. Thanks for the heads up.
    Tammy
    Apple with Many Seeds

  2. Tammy,

    I found the ones about artists to be good resources, too. I used them as an Art Masterpiece volunteer. Even if the activity didn’t quite fit the age group, the books are great sources of ideas to use as jumping off points.

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