Oops-A-Daisy by Melody Delgado #ReadYourWorld #Kidlit

Today we have a fun new middle grade book that fits the multicultural theme:  Oops-A-Daisy (The De La Cruz Diaries Book 1) by Melody Delgado.

 

Daisy De la Cruz is a twelve-year-old aspiring singer and actress. She has won a few parts for commercials on television, but she always is stuck wearing a full costume. Will she ever get to show her face?

Some parts of this book a hilarious. For example, Daisy’s thoughts when she isn’t given much of a break during taping of a commercial:

When I’m heading up my own studio the actors won’t get a measly little five-minute break. No way! I’ll give them at least six.

Fiction is supposed to show readers how to deal with real life issues and this novel does a good job of tackling some age-appropriate problems. For example, the middle school years can be fraught with landmines when it comes to friendships. Delgado shows how friends can change and how to deal with those changes in a positive way.

Another issue that kids run into is not getting the part they wanted, whether it is auditioning for a play, a commercial, or trying out for a sports team. Daisy experiences some disappointments and set backs, but she stays positive and keeps trying. That kind of persistence can make all the difference for achieving success in the future.

Let’s not forget the multicultural aspects of the book. Set in Florida, Daisy’s grandfather is from Puerto Rico and the family speaks some Spanish. The back matter has a glossary of the Spanish words and phrases used. This book would be a good fit for Multicultural Children’s Book Day (see info below).

Oops-A-Daisy is a fun, wholesome book with a lot of good messages to offer middle grade readers. It is perfect not only for budding singers or actors, but also for anyone who has struggled with friendships. Check out a copy today.

Age Range: 7 – 12 years
Publisher: Clean Reads (October 3, 2017)
ISBN-10: 162135699X
ISBN-13: 978-1621356998

Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2018 (1/27/18) is its fifth year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness on the ongoing need to include kid’s books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators.

Disclosure: This book was provided for review purposes. I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Adding a Comment on a (Blogger) Blog

While participating in the Bloggiesta Mini-Challenge this weekend, I have been leaving quite a few comments on blogs. What an experience!

Because one of the Bloggiesta challenges was to create an infographic using Piktochart, I decided to show (in a less-than-serious way) what leaving a comment on a Blogger blog is like for a WordPress user.

Adding CommentThose are screenshots from an actual attempt to leave a comment using my WordPress profile.

To Blogger users:  including the Name/URL option makes it easier for non-Blogger users to comment.

Final solution:  I eventually revived my old Blogger profile, although I still lose comments the first time.

 

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While leaving comments was a challenge, Piktochart is the most fun I’ve had in ages. It is very easy to learn. I had made my first infographic in minutes.  I recommend it!

 

French For Cats

To start out our exploration of books useful for introducing young people to world languages, let’s take a look at two little books that are sure to spark an interest in French:  French for Cats: All the French Your Cat Will Ever Need and Advanced French for Exceptional Cats: Sophisticated French for a Cat as Smart as Yours by Henry Beard (and John Boswell) and illustrated by Gary Zamchick. Both books are written in English and French with a lighthearted humor that is sure to warm the hearts of cat lovers and language lovers alike.

Both are little books, only roughly four by six inches, but they pack a big dose of laughs. Just to be clear, there is a bit of “potty” (well, litterbox) humor and referenced to being neutered, so the reader range is probably mature middle grade to young adult.

The illustrations are pen and ink cartoons with watercolor, in keeping with the light tone of the books.

Example of text:

What I do
Ce Que Je Fais

I meow
Je miaule

I purr
Je ronronne

I sleep
Je dors

If you own cats, you know about that last one. 🙂

French for Cats works as a fun introduction to vocabulary for beginners and a brush up for more advanced speakers. Advanced French for Exceptional Cats even has a mini-session in grammar.

To get you in the mood, here is a video of another French cat, Henrí. Although the humor of the video is more subtle than the books, it still makes me laugh out loud. Look for videos like this one to hear French being spoken.

Although the first editions were printed in the 1990’s, the books were bestsellers and were reprinted, so it shouldn’t be too difficult to find a copy.

French for Cats: All the French Your Cat Will Ever Need by Henry Beard, John Boswell and illustrated by Gary Zamchick

Hardcover: 96 pages
Publisher: Villard; 1 edition (October 8, 1991)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 067940676X
ISBN-13: 978-0679406761

Advanced French for Exceptional Cats:  Sophisticated French for a Cat as Smart as Yours by Henry Beard and illustrated by Gary Zamchick

Publisher: Villard; First Edition 2nd edition (October 27, 1992)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0679417648
ISBN-13: 978-0679417644

Asterix the Gaul

Time for another humorous series of books that have been entertaining (and secretly educating) people for decades. 

I was first introduced Asterix the Gaul by Rene Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo in my high school Latin class many years ago. The text had been translated from the original French into Latin. Does that sound dry? A book about Gauls from Roman times written in Latin? Wrong! My classmates and I loved the spunky cartoon characters so much, we would spend hours trying to figure out what each was saying. I’m sure all my success in Latin is due to the foresight of our teacher to provide us with Asterix books.

Several years ago, I stumbled on an English version. It turns out that there is a whole series featuring Asterix and Orion publishers has been re-releasing the books. I immediately bought several for my then elementary-school-age son. He loved them, too. In fact he went in costume as Asterix the Gaul on Halloween, and was bitterly disappointed when everyone thought he was a Viking.

What’s to love:

  • Incredibly clever word play and side-splitting puns
  • A humorous overview of history and geography during Roman times
  • Sly references to classics, films and famous pieces of artwork

What a few parents may not love:

  • Cartoon violence in the form of fighting

Most of the violence is the direct result of the conflict between the Gauls and the Romans, which is historically appropriate. To me, it seems so over-the-top slapstick that it is not objectionable, but I did want to mention it for those that are sensitive to such things.

You can get somewhat of a feel for the flavor in the film version. (The books are better. They don’t have the dated feel.)

Although listed as for ages 9-12, the Asterix books are really for all ages. Our local library files them in young adult or sometimes in graphic books. If your child is learning a language or you want to brush up on the language you took in high school, you might consider the French or Latin versions as well.

Reading level: Ages 9-12
Publisher: Orion (September 1, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0752866052
ISBN-13: 978-0752866055

Asterix the Gaul is the first in the series.

A selection from the Asterix series in English

A selection from the Asterix series in French

A selection from The Asterix series in Latin