Poetry Matters: Writing a Poem from the Inside Out by Ralph Fletcher

In Celebration of National Poetry Month

Poetry Matters is a “how to” book that is a joy to read, particularly if you like poetry. The author says, “Maybe you’ve heard before that poetry is magic, and it made you roll your eyes, but I believe it is true. Poetry matters.” He goes on to explain how important poetry is because it allows us to communicate during difficult times when no other form of expression will work. You can tell he truly feels the power of poetry.

This book is written for preteens, and Ralph Fletcher has obviously spent a lot of time working with young people. He knows what beginning poets need to learn and how to keep their attention. His recommendations are to the point and he’s included a lot of concrete, practical advice on how to get that poem onto paper and then polish it until it is the best it can be. He’s provided the inspiration needed to “light the spark,” and then sprinkled the text with examples of poetry from real kids.

When I picked this book to review I didn’t remember it, but one of the chapters is an interview with Kristine O’Connell George who wrote the wonderful Fold Me a Poem book that I reviewed in the previous post. Here she has a number of useful tips, including the suggestion to tape record yourself reading you poems and then listen carefully when you have time to concentrate. As she says, you can even hear where the commas need to go.

This book is a great resource for older children (and even beginning adults) who are interested in writing poetry. If every school used this book to teach poetry, I am positive that poetry would be everyone’s favorite subject.

Reading level: Ages 9-12
Paperback: 160 pages
Publisher: HarperCollins (February 19, 2002)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0380797038
ISBN-13: 978-0380797035

nonfictionmonday

Nonfiction Monday is a blogging celebration of nonfiction books for kids. For more information, stop by Picture Book of the Day. This week the celebration is at Abby (the) Librarian blogspot.

Picture Book Review: Fold Me a Poem

In Celebration of National Poetry Month:


Fold Me a Poem by Kristine O’Connell George and and illustrated by Lauren Stringer is one of those picture books that you love to review because it is so easy. Dig through your bag of superlatives, sprinkle a few in each sentence and you are done. It is simply an outstanding book.

Through spare poems, the author tells a lovely tale of a boy folding and interacting with a zoo of origami animals. She mixes humor, conflict and adventure to tell a compelling story, starting with a bare haiku about the boy folding a rooster and the rooster waking up. The results are enchanting.

The illustrator admits she had to learn how to fold origami to make the illustrations for the book, and you can see her hard work. The illustrations really shine. The lively images carry the story line just the right amount.

Supposedly for ages 4-8, this book appeals to a much broader age range. I know an 11 year-old-boy who enjoyed it immensely, and adults have raved about it, too. Not only is the book engaging, it is also inspiring. We wanted to fold origami and write poems as soon as we finished it. See how we folded paper butterflies in the illustrations and photos below.

Be sure to visit  Kristine O’Connell George’s website, as well Lauren Stringer’s origami instructions, for additional information, educational activities and peeks into the book.

Fold Me a Poem by Kristine O’Connell George and illustrated by Lauren Stringer
Reading level: Ages 4-8
Hardcover: 56 pages
Publisher: Harcourt Children’s Books (April 1, 2005)
ISBN-10: 0152025014
ISBN-13: 978-0152025014

To fold a paper butterfly, take a look at the illustration here and then the photos below. Start with a square piece of paper, any size, but preferably brightly colored. If it is colored only on one side, make sure the colored side is facing out on the first fold.

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Photo 1. Offset the two corners about an inch on the first fold if you are using eight inch square paper.

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Photo 2. Simply fold the two sides together down the center between the two tails. Already it starts to look like a butterfly.

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Photo 3. Now fold up a “body” of roughly 1/3 inch along the center fold. Crease one way, unfold, and then turn over and fold again.

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Enjoy your spring butterfly!