Consumer Safety and Children’s Books

After spending the week buying used books at bookstores, on e-bay and in the library, I had to wonder how the availability of children’s books might change over the upcoming year when the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act goes into effect next year.

In 2007, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act was passed to prohibit the sale of items intended for use by children 12 and under that hadn’t been tested for the element lead (and certain phthalates) and deemed safe. If you haven’t heard about it, check the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act website at http://www.cpsc.gov/ABOUT/Cpsia/cpsia.HTML#whatsnew.

Right now it looks like it is okay to sell older books:

“Children’s books printed after 1985 that are conventionally printed and intended to be read (as opposed to used for play) OK to sell; however, books with metal spiral bindings have been recalled for lead paint.

Vintage children’s books and other collectibles not considered primarily intended for children OK to sell.”

Newer children’s books, however, are still subject to testing at this time. This will be extremely expensive (right when library budgets are already stretched to the limit), time-consuming, and probably largely futile as books would not have the potential to contain large amounts of lead unless they have metal bindings.

As you might imagine, the libraries are actively involved in clarifying the details of this act and also pushing for an exemption for books already in library collections. Booksellers are also lobbying Congress.

Check the American Library Association District Dispatch for details.
http://www.wo.ala.org/districtdispatch/?p=3014

Until the dust settles, I plan to buy and stockpile a lot of used children’s books this year.

What do you think?

Eidt; More: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml09/09120.html

Here’s the latest about libraries 9/24. http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6698584.html?nid=2788&source=title&rid=1936824386

Father’s Day Books for Kids and Dads

Just in time for Father’s Day, some books for children and one for dads.

Board Book

Daddy Hugs by Karen Katz

A good first book

Picture Books for Children

What Dads Can’t Do by Douglas Wood and Doug Cushman (Illustrator)

Humorous approach to fatherhood for the younger set.

Just Me and My Dad by Mercer Mayer

Little Critter goes camping with his dad in this sweet book.

Ages 9-12

My Funny Dad, Harry by Karen Arlettaz Zemek

A true story of a funny and quirky father

For Dads:

Halfway to Heaven: My White-knuckled–and Knuckleheaded–Quest for the Rocky Mountain High by Mark Obmascik

The humorous story of a stay-at-home-dad who decides to climb all of Colorado’s 14,000 feet mountains and what he discovers along the way.

Hope you enjoy them with your dad!

State(s) of Children’s Books Continued

Update:  Visit our website Reading through the States for children’s books by organized state.

 

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Ever since I started the States of Children’s Books List, I have been running across books that should be added to the list of books for children to read while traveling across the United States.

Here are a few more:

(Note: The list in this post is no long maintained. Be sure to visit the website.)

California

Seeds of Hope: The Gold Rush Diary of Susanna Fairchild, California Territory 1849 (Dear America Series) by Kristiana Gregory

A popular addition to the Dear America Series.

Hawaii

Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows (Dear America Series) by Barry Denenberg

Minnesota

The Porcupine Year (Hardcover) by Louise Erdrich

New York

Rosie in New York City: Gotcha! by Carol Matas

For the younger set starting to learn about the states, I highly recommend

The Scrambled States of America by Laurie Keller – the book and the game.

The Scrambled States of America Talent Show by Laurie Keller

The Scramble States Game is Awesome!!! Teaches state trivia in a hilarious way. No household should be without a copy (seriously!)

Note About Contact

Just FYI:

Some of you may have noticed a contact form that was up on and off for the last month. I have been trying to get it to work. Although it looked like it was working from the front end, I never got the test messages at the back end. If you left a message, I’m afraid I didn’t get it.

For now, if you need to contact me, please leave a comment. I’ll try to get something better going in the next few weeks.

And if you have any suggestions on how to create a wordpress-friendly contact form, I would love to hear them.