#Nonfiction Monday Seeds Move by Robin Page

For Nonfiction Monday we have the picture book Seeds Move by Robin Page.

Written in the increasingly popular two-level text, Seeds Move! explores many of the ways seeds move or disperse.

The simpler, “story” text repeats rhythmically from page to page:

A seed hitchhikes.
A seed shoots.
A seed catapults…

A paragraph of denser, detailed text explains the specific examples shown in each illustration.

And what beautiful illustrations they are. It is easy to see why Robin Page received a Caldecott Honor in 2004 for What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?

In the end, Page describes how humans plant seeds, too. She then suggests planting a watermelon seed to see what happens.

Just a side note:  Nothing to do with the author/illustrator, but some of the finer details of many modern picture books are missing. Librarians will likely be disappointed because of the lack of back matter. Art aficionados will likely wish the end papers had been illustrated.  That said, the text and illustrations themselves are wonderful.

If you are looking for a nonfiction picture book about seed dispersal, look no further than Seeds Move! Young readers will plant themselves in their chairs when they open this book.

Related:

See our seed dispersal plant science unit at Growing With Science.

Check out our growing list of children’s books about seeds at Science Books for Kids.

Age Range: 3 – 8 years
Publisher: Beach Lane Books (March 19, 2019)
ISBN-10: 1534409157
ISBN-13: 978-1534409156

 

Disclosure: The book was provided by our local library. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

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Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

#Kidlit Rosa’s Animals: Biography of Rosa Bonheur

Today let’s highlight a middle grade marvel, Rosa’s Animals:  The Story of Rosa Bonheur and Her Painting Menagerie by Maryann Macdonald.

Rosa’s Animals by Maryann Macdonald

Have you ever heard of Rosa Bonheur? She was a Realist painter and sculptor from France in the mid 1800s known for her dynamic paintings of animals.  Trained by her father at a time when women were not encouraged to be painters, Rosa broke with convention to become a popular and revered artist.

The illustrations include paintings not only by Rosa Bonheur, but also some of her contemporaries to show context for her work. The backmatter is quite extensive, consisting of an author’s note and references.

I don’t know how I missed Rosa’s Animals because it got starred reviews in all the right places when it first came out. If you’ve overlooked it too, perhaps now is the time to seek out a copy.

Activity Suggestion:

Rosa is known for her amazing ability to paint realistic fur and also her use of light. She is a good artist to introduce to middle grade students. Find some images of Rosa Bonheur’s works on the internet to share and discuss. (WikiArt has a collection). Encourage students to try their hand at drawing and painting animals.

 

Public domain image of a Rosa Bonheur painting from Wikimedia.

Age Range: 8 – 12 years
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams (June 5, 2018)
ISBN-10: 1419728504
ISBN-13: 978-1419728501

Disclosure: The book was provided by our local library. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

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Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

STEM Friday #Kidlit To Celebrate 50th Anniversary of the Lunar Landing

Saturday July 20, 2019 is the 50th  Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing. To celebrate, let’s check out a new middle grade book about the moon.

Luna: The Science and Stories of Our Moon by David  A. Aguilar

 

Beginning with how the moon is thought to have come about and how the moon compares with Earth, Aguilar then takes the reader on a ride through other moons, as well as moon myths and hoaxes, before settling down for a detailed discussion of moon features. Perfect for the lunar landing anniversary is a section about what the Apollo astronauts discovered.

The pluses:  The book is filled with fantastic illustrations by David A. Agulilar. Also there are three hands-on activities in the back: making a 3D model of lunar craters with Plaster of Paris, using a small telescope to explore the moon, and directions for drawing the moon.

Slight minus is that the thin shape and design of the book give it a picture book look, and middle grade readers might hesitate to pick it up. For example, the children shown on page 34 are obviously younger than the 10-12 year old target range.  The density of the text and vocabulary level, however, put it firmly into the middle grade level.

Luna is arriving on shelves just as interest in the moon and lunar landings is peaking. Explore a copy today!

Related:

Anastasia Suen’s Apollo 11 Booklist artiicle

Want to read more? See our growing list of books about the moon and lunar landings at Science Books for Kids.

Age Range: 10 – 12 years
Publisher: National Geographic Children’s Books (June 11, 2019)
ISBN-10: 1426333226
ISBN-13: 978-1426333224

Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.Opens in a new window Note: this is a new link as of 1/2019.