New #kidlit From Animal Planet: Animal Atlas

I’m back from Camp NaNoWriMo. Do you wonder how it went?

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First draft of novel completed!

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Let’s kick off being back to blogging about children’s books with Animal Planet’s new book, Animal Atlas, with text by James Buckley, Jr. and maps by Aaron Meshon. It arrives on shelves on May 17.

 

Animal Planet Animal Atlas guides children through the world of animals in an orderly fashion, with chapters representing the seven continents plus the oceans. The chapters begin with a map of the featured continent and descriptions of the biomes that occur there, such as rainforest, desert, and tundra. In the following pages are covered with big, bright photographs of different kinds of animals living in each biome, from a type of antelope known as an addax to stripy zebras.  Short descriptions of the animals are included in color-coded sidebars. Finally, children will want to look for the Reach Out. Act. Respond or ROAR sidebars highlighting conservation and animal rescue efforts in that region.

What’s great about this big book is that it is a resource children are likely to return to again and again. Young children may use it to learn the names of animals. Older children will start to see emergent patterns, such as the animals found in northern areas or taigas are more likely to be white at least part of the year.

The bottom line is that Animal Atlas is sure to please young animal lovers everywhere!

Related:

If this book inspires a child to learn more, try the books in the Animal Planet Animal Bites Series, reviewed recently at Growing with Science.

Age Range: 6 +
Publisher: Animal Planet (May 24, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1618931652
ISBN-13: 978-1618931658

 

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Disclosure: This book was supplied by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

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Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

#Cybils: Frozen Wild Tells How Animals Survive Winter

Winter might not be in full force yet, but many children have questions about what happens to animals when it gets cold out. Frozen Wild: How Animals Survive in the Coldest Places on Earth (Slither and Crawl) by Jim Arnosky describes how animals are able to live in the cold places, including the Arctic and Antarctic regions (nominated for the 2015 Cybils award in the Elementary/Middle Grade Nonfiction category.)

The first thing you notice about Frozen Wild is the gorgeous paintings, all done with a cool color palette. To fully capture the effect, many of the pages fold out into panoramic scenes. Lovely!

Accompanying the illustrations is a fact-filled text, where young readers learn about insulation, feeding behavior and even the importance of “goose bumps.”

Jim Arnosky is an incredible naturalist, writer, and artist. He has written many nonfiction children’s books about animals and the natural world. As with many other of his books, he includes first person narration that helps bring young readers into his world. As he says on the last page, “I live in awe of wild things.”

Frozen Wild: How Animals Survive in the Coldest Places on Earth is a perfect book to curl up with on a cold winter day. Pick it up for units on animals, weather, and the seasons, as well.

Age Range: 6 – 10 years
Publisher: Sterling Children’s Books (September 1, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1454910259
ISBN-13: 978-1454910251

Disclosures: This book was provided by our local library. I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at not extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.

#Cybils: This Side of Wild

Gary Paulsen is the ultimate storyteller. Many of his books, including the wildly popular Hatchet, are on almost every school reading list. Now Paulsen’s latest work, This Side of Wild: Mutts, Mares, and Laughing Dinosaurs illustrated by Tim Jessell, has already quietly made the longlist in Young People’s Literature for the 2015 National Book Awards, as well as is a nominee for a 2015 Cybils award in the Elementary/Middle Grade Nonfiction category.

In a series of essays, Paulsen reveals some unusual encounters he has had with animals, particularly dogs, but birds, horses and honey bees as well. His thesis is that animals may have more going for them in the way of intelligence, and even compassion for other animals, than we may have previously thought.

As with some of his other works, Paulsen reveals that his parents were alcoholics and suggests at some of the neglect and abuse he suffered as a child. He also writes about some serious topics, such as the distress he felt while serving in the military as an 18 year old, as well as the horrors he saw in the aftermath of World War II while visiting his father. Although the publisher suggests the book is appropriate for 10 and up, it is probably for more mature readers unless the students are given extra preparation and guidance.

This Side of Wild is chock full of compelling and powerful stories that are sure to stay with the reader long after the book is finished. It would make an excellent gift for anyone interested in nature, animals and adventure, plus readers who are already fans of Gary Paulsen. Be sure to pick up a copy for yourself as well!

Age Range: 10 and up
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (September 29, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1481451502
ISBN-13: 978-1481451505

Disclosure: This book came from the library. I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

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Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

#Cybils: Flying With The Wolf-Birds

Today’s Cybils nominee, The Wolf-Birds by Willow Dawson, was a complete surprise. It was shelved in the fiction section of our library. It looks and reads like a fictional picture book. Watch out, however, because under the fictional look is a serious nonfiction work based on cutting-edge animal behavior research.

Why are ravens called wolf-birds? Dawson reveals there is a complex relationship between ravens and gray wolves, particularly in areas with cold, harsh winters. It all points to the idea that nature is not as simple as it sometimes seems, that interrelationships exist that we might not be aware of, but that can be easily disrupted because of our actions.

As to be expected, a book about predators must necessarily feature the deaths of a few animals. In this case, the author put a lot of thought into how death was presented. Find out more with this fabulous Q-and-A video with the author.

As for the illustrations, the unique and exciting acrylic paintings lend a primal feel and would be perfect inspirations for art lessons on cave paintings or aboriginal art. Pull out the charcoal, cray-pas, and earth-toned paper!

Overall, The Wolf-Birds is perfect for young readers interested in science and nature, particularly animals. It is also likely to appeal to those readers who think they prefer fiction. It is one of those versatile books to pull it out for units on winter, animal behavior, and even art.

Related:  Sue recently reviewed this book at Nonfiction Monday.

Looking for more children’s books about birds? Check out our growing list of books for young birdwatchers at Science Books for Kids.

Age Range: 5 – 8 years
Grade Level: Kindergarten – 3
Hardcover: 40 pages
Publisher: Owlkids Books (September 15, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1771470542
ISBN-13: 978-1771470544

Disclosures: This book was provided by our local library. I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at not extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.