STEM Friday #Kidlit All Eyes on Alexandra

For STEM Friday we’re thrilled to be taking part in a blog tour for the picture book All Eyes on Alexandra by Anna Levine and illustrated by Chiara Pasqualotto.

Millions and millions of birds migrate through Israel on their way to Europe, Asia, and Africa. All Eyes on Alexandra is the fictional story of one young stork who has trouble following the rest of the flock as they prepare for the big trip. Readers will soon learn, however, that those who have trouble following might have other talents instead.

The illustrations are full of action and fun. They were done by Chiara Pasqualotto, who was born in Padua, in northern Italy, and who currently teaches illustration and drawing classes to children and adults, in particular in Padua during the summer at the Scuola Internazionale di Comics and in Rome. To help youngsters figure out which crane is Alexandra in each illustration, Chiara has wrapped her neck with a bit of red string. Although an unusual tactic, it seems to fit right in with Alexandra’s dare-to-be-different character.

All Eyes on Alexandra is a perfect example to show that STEM books don’t have to be nonfiction. It introduces children both to an amazing natural phenomena, a massive bird migration, and also to a personal story that they might be able to relate to their own lives or families. Those who love fiction are introduced to facts and those who love nonfiction are introduced to stories. It is win-win.

It would also be useful to share before a trip to Israel because it mentions and shows several locations to visit. Children might pretend they are Alexandra and find out more about each site online, which is likely to help them prepare and perhaps excite them to discover more. I know I’m inspired to sign up for a bird watching trip after reading it.

It is a lovely and versatile picture book. Let All Eyes on Alexandra take you on a journey today!

Activity Suggestions:

Author Anna Levine has three awesome activity suggestions to accompany the book at our sister blog, Growing With Science.

Age Range: 3 – 8 years
Publisher: Kar-Ben Pub (August 1, 2018)
ISBN-10: 1512444391
ISBN-13: 978-1512444391

Curious to learn more? Be sure to visit the remaining stops in the blog tour:

December 15th @ A Storybook World
Visit Deirdra’s blog where she features Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra in a spotlight post.

December 17th @ World of My Imagination
Stop by Nicole’s blog today where you can read her review of Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 18th @ Oh, for the Hook of a Book
Visit Erin’s blog again where you can read Anna Levine’s blog post featuring activities for young children to explore their world.

December 19th @ Cassandra’s Writing World
Visit Cassandra’s blog again where you can read Anna Levine’s blog post about naming your characters.– oh, I need this one.

December 19th @ Linda’s Blog
Make sure you visit Linda’s blog today where you can read her thoughts about Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 20th @ Word Magic: All About Books
Visit Fiona’s blog where you can read her review of Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 21st @ Bring on Lemons
Make sure you grab some lemonade and stop by Crystal’s blog today where she reviews Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 27th @ Linda’s Blog
Visit Linda’s blog again where you can read her interview with author Anna Levine.

December 28th @ Beverley A. Baird’s Blog
Visit Beverley’s blog today you can read her review of Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 31st @ Strength 4 Spouses
Visit Wendi’s blog and read Anna Levine’s guest post on learning about families and different cultures.

January 2nd @ Author Anthony Avina’s Blog
Visit author Anthony Avina’s blog where he shares his thoughts about Anna Levine’s picture book All Eyes on Alexandra.

January 3rd @ Beverley A. Baird’s Blog
Visit Beverley’s blog again where you can read Anna Levine’s blog post about getting into the head of your middle-grade characters.

January 4th @ Author Anthony Avina’s Blog
Visit author Anthony Avina’s blog again where you can read Anna Levine’s blog post about using fiction to write non-fiction. **can’t wait to see this.

January 7th @ Strength 4 Spouses Blog
Visit Wendi’s blog again where you can read her thoughts about the book All Eyes on Alexandra by Anna Levine.

Disclosure: This book was provided electronically  by the author for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Come visit the STEM Friday blog each week to find more great Science, Technology, Engineering and Math books.Opens in a new window Note: this is a new link as of 10/2018.

#Nonfiction Monday The Girl Who Drew Butterflies

Let’s explore some of the fantastic nonfiction children’s books that have been nominated for 2018 Cybils awards.

I’ve been meaning to review the middle grade biography The Girl Who Drew Butterflies: How Maria Merian’s Art Changed Science by Joyce Sidman for a few months now. Why haven’t I? Perhaps I’ve wanted to keep this gorgeous book all to myself.

Maria Sibylla Merian was a woman far ahead of her time. She was an artist, a scientist, and a bold adventurer who traveled to Surinam during the 1600s all wrapped up in one. So right off the bat, this is the biography of an interesting person.

When I say this book is gorgeous, I’m not kidding. Starting with the gold lettering and border on the cover, to the menagerie of Merian’s butterfly and caterpillar illustrations in the endpapers, to Joyce Sidman’s own color photographs of insect life stages, The Girl Who Drew is a visual feast.

Even the chapter titles are creative. Each is a stage during insect metamorphosis that parallels Maria’s own development:  Egg, Hatching, First Instar, etc. It also reflects her intense interest in how animals develop from stage to stage. How clever is that?

Don’t underestimate the historical information, either. Readers learn about what life was like during the 1600s. Throw in old maps and oodles of back matter and you have a book that has lasting power.

The Girl Who Drew Butterflies is a treat for budding artists and scientists alike. Be inspired by a copy today.

Public domain artwork by Maria Sibylla Merian

Age Range: 10 – 12 years
Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (February 20, 2018)
ISBN-10: 0544717139
ISBN-13: 978-0544717138

Disclosure: The book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

nonfictionmonday

Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

#Nonfiction Monday Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor

Let’s explore some of the fantastic nonfiction children’s books that have been nominated for 2018 Cybils awards.

For Nonfiction Monday we have the picture book biography Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor: The Woman Who Loved Reptiles by Patricia Valdez and illustrated by Felicita Sala.

Fascinated by reptiles from an early age, Joan Procter found a mentor in Dr. George Boulenger who was the curator of reptiles and fish at the Natural History Museum. She became his assistant at a young age and took over his position when he retired. She mixed art and science, doing scientific research and creating exhibits at the Museum at the same time. Later, after designing a reptile house at the London Zoo, she formed a special bond with the most unlikely animal, a huge Komodo dragon.

Joan Procter was a person ahead of her time and she probably don’t get the recognition she deserved because of it. From the catchy title on in, Patricia Valdez has done her part to shine the light on this amazing woman whose passion for reptiles helped her forge new paths for women as scientists. Valdez has chosen anecdotes from Procter’s life, like taking a small crocodile to math class, that are sure to engage and thrill young readers.

Like a chameleon, Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor will fit many lessons. Pull out a copy not only for Women’s History Month, but also for a STEM lesson on reptiles or the lives of scientists. It is perfect for history buffs and budding scientists alike.

Activity Suggestions:

Age Range: 4 – 8 years
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (March 13, 2018)
ISBN-10: 0399557253
ISBN-13: 978-0399557255

Check out our growing list of biographies of women scientists at Science Books for Kids.

 

Disclosure: The book was provided by the publisher for Cybils review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

nonfictionmonday

Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

Blog Tour for All Eyes On Alexandra Starts Tomorrow #kidlit

I’m excited to announce that next week I’m going to be part of a blog tour announcing the new picture book, All Eyes on Alexandra by Anna Levine and illustrated by Chiara Pasqualotto.

 

What it’s about:

In All Eyes on Alexandra, young Alexandra Crane is terrible at following her family in their flying Vee. She can’t help it that the world is so full of interesting distracting sights! When it’s time for the Cranes to migrate to Israel’s Hula Valley for the winter, Alexandra is excited but her family is worried. Will Alexandra stay with the group, and what happens if a dangerous situation should arise? Might Alexandra—and the rest of the flock—discover that a bad follower can sometimes make a great leader?

Young readers learn about the real crane migration.

If you can’t wait for my post on December 14 to find out about it, be sure to visit the blogs on this week of the tour:

December 3rd @ The Muffin
What goes better in the morning than a muffin? Make sure you visit WOW’s blog and read an interview with the author and enter for a chance to win a copy of the book All Eyes on Alexandra.  –Direct link to post.

December 5th @ Cassandra’s Writing World
Visit Cassandra’s blog where she shares her thoughts about Anna Levine’s picture book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 5th @ Break Even Books
Visit Erik’s blog where you can read Anna Levine’s guest post about how to jog your inspiration. I’ll be sure to catch that one.

December 7th @ Coffee with Lacey
Grab some coffee and visit Lacey’s blog where you can read her review of Anna Levine’s picture book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 8th @ Author Anthony Avina’s Blog
Visit Anthony Avina’s blog where he joins in the fun of celebrating and shares information about Anna Levine’s book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 8th @ Christy’s Cozy Corners
Visit Christy’s blog and cozy up while you read her review of Anna Levine’s picture book All Eyes on Alexandra.

December 9th @ Coffee with Lacey
Visit Lacey’s blog again where you can read Anna Levine’s guest post about designing your ideal writing spot. – I need help with this, so I’m looking forward to it.

December 9th @ Christy’s Cozy Corner
Visit Christy’s blog where you can read Anna Levine’s blog post about how she decided to use crane’s in her story.

Can’t wait for more next week.

Thanks to blog tour manager Nicole Pyles for organizing this event and providing the materials.