#Kidlit for #npm16: Two New Children’s Books by Sue Fliess

It’s time to plan for National Poetry Month. Let’s start by pulling out two new children’s picture books –written in rhyming verse by Sue Fliess — to share with young readers.

Sue Fliess is a master of the subtly humorous, fast-paced rhyming text that is so appealing to little ones. She also knows what interests children.

The Bug Book features a delightful array of creepy, crawlies.

The book is illustrated with colorful stock photographs of insects and other bugs, which will help children learn more about them.

I really like the “go explore nature” message on the first page:

Grab a bucket. Check your guide.
Let’s go find some bugs outside!

Related:

See suggestions for related insect and poetry activities at Growing with Science.

Age Range: 3 – 5 years
Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap (February 23, 2016)
ISBN-10: 044848935X
ISBN-13: 978-0448489353

Calling All Cars by Sue Fliess and illustrated by Sarah Beise celebrates an age-appropriate interest in forms of transportation.

Follow all sorts of cars through a day long road trip, which ends with a gentle bedtime message:

Rest cars, Hush cars
No more rush, cars.
Cars pull in, turn off the light.
Sweet dreams, sleepy cars…goodnight!

The artist added interest by including clues to the events of the next page. Children will have great fun guessing what comes next.

You can get a feel for the book by watching the book trailer.

Although it has a fiction feel, this basic concept book will appeal to lovers of nonfiction, too.

Be sure to pick up The Bug Book and Calling All Cars for fun reading adventures in April!

Related Activities:

Visit Sue’s website for a Calling All Cars Activity Guide to download.

Check the National Poetry Month Website for 30 Ways to Celebrate

Age Range: 3 – 7 years
Publisher: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky (March 1, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1492618810
ISBN-13: 978-1492618812

Disclosure:  Calling All Cars was retrieved from NetGalley. The Bug Book was supplied by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

nonfictionmonday

Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.

Molly Bang’s Picture This – 25th Anniversary Edition Coming Fall 2016

Have you ever been to a workshop where you went in expecting one experience and then were blown away by a totally different one? At the Tucson Festival of Books last weekend I went to a workshop by award-winning children’s book illustrator Molly Bang, mainly to hang out with a friend. I expected the workshop to be a discussion of some of Bang’s recent works. Instead it was a mind-blowing hands-on lesson in how to create emotion in illustrations based on her book, Picture This.

In the workshop Molly Bang went over some fundamentals about how to build a scary picture versus a soothing picture using simple shapes of different colors. She then gave the members of the audience the opportunity to apply the ideas by making our own illustrations using four colors of construction paper. Afterwards she assembled all the works on the floor and we got to see the multitude of ways the techniques came together.

Surprisingly, even though I have no aspirations to become a children’s book illustrator, I found many of the things applicable to my own recent writing project. I could see how our visceral responses to color, shape and relative positioning of objects could be elicited through words as well as art. It was fascinating!

Molly Bang is known for her children’s books, but Picture This: How Pictures Work is written for adults, particularly those interested in the arts.  It is so popular that Chronicle Books is releasing a 25th Edition version in the Fall of 2016. You can pre-order it at Amazon here.

Related:

Brief Bio:  Although her mother had studied medical illustration, Molly Bang didn’t take up illustration until after trying several other careers, including a degree in French and a reporting stint that ended when she was fired. She started illustrating folktales, and later branched out into writing her own stories. Her work with children’s books has led to numerous awards, including Caldecott Honors. Recently has written several science books, and in 2010 Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring the Earth to Life won the AAAS/Subaru SB & F Prize for Excellence in Science Books.

Molly has a wonderful discussion of how Picture This came about on her website. I really appreciate her insight that since she didn’t feel she understood something, she taught a class about it. I agree that in addition to being an expert on a topic, teaching can be a wonderful way to force you to gather and organize materials on a subject, as well was get feedback from the students.  It’s a two-way process.

She also has a free manual to download:  How to Write a Hero/ine Adventure Journey Folktale: A Manual for Teachers of Grades 8 and 9

See more of her books at Molly Bang’s Amazon Author Page.

#kidlit: Wake Up with Good Morning Yoga Book

Bedtime stories for children abound, but what about a book to help children get up and ready for the day? Good Morning Yoga: A Pose-by-Pose Wake Up Story by Mariam Gates and illustrated by Sarah Jane Hinder encourages children to breathe, stretch, and move as part of a comforting wake up routine.

Be aware that before reading this book, you should have a nice open bit of floor nearby, because readers are going to want to try out all the poses right away.

Written in the first person voice, each two-page spread consists of detailed instructions for a pose, starting with the gently repeating phrase

“As I breathe in, as I breathe out,”

as well as a single sentence or phrase in a larger font that gives a more general description of the pose to help children remember it. The illustrations also help with positioning.

Mariam Gates is an experienced teacher and is also married to a yoga teacher, so she has chosen a series of poses appropriate for children. For ease of use, the entire sequence is also repeated in the back matter with a series of smaller illustrations.

It isn’t a stretch to say this Good Morning Yoga is a book children will want to return to again and again.  Pick up a copy for use whenever children need a energizing break or pick-me-up session throughout the day.

Related:

This video book trailer shows Mariam Gates discussing her motivations for writing the book, as well as a peek into one of her yoga classes for kids.

Watching this video makes me wish I could take her classes.

Extras include a Yoga Story Hour Kit for active story times at home, library, school, or bookstores.

Yoga Story Hour Kit by sarahshealy

Age Range: 4 – 8 years
Publisher: Sounds True (March 1, 2016)
ISBN-10: 1622036026
ISBN-13: 978-1622036028

Ready for bed instead? Be sure to check out the popular Good Night Yoga.

Disclosure: This book was supplied by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

nonfictionmonday

Looking for more children’s nonfiction books? Try the Nonfiction Monday blog.